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There was perhaps an as yet unidentified native Etruscan word for the vase that pre-empted the adoption of amphora., Bennett's AMPHORA, which has a number of scribal variants.The first systematic classification of Roman amphorae types was undertaken by the German scholar Heinrich Dressel.Following the exceptional amphora deposit uncovered in Rome in Castro Pretorio at the end of the 1800s, he collected almost 200 inscriptions from amphorae and included them in the Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum.They are most often ceramic, but examples in metals and other materials have been found.Versions of the amphorae were one of many shapes used in Ancient Greek vase painting.

It is remarkable that even though the Etruscans imported, manufactured, and exported amphorae extensively in their wine industry, and other Greek vase names were Etruscanized, no Etruscan form of the word exists.It indicates the name of the figlina (workshop) and/or the name of the owner of the workshop.Painted stamps, tituli picti, recorded the weight of the container and the contents, and were applied after the amphora was filled.Below: Panathenaic prize amphora in the black-figure style, showing the goddess Athena An amphora (Greek: Αμφορέας, English plural: amphorae or amphoras) is a type of container of a characteristic shape and size, descending from at least as early as the Neolithic Period.Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine.

It is remarkable that even though the Etruscans imported, manufactured, and exported amphorae extensively in their wine industry, and other Greek vase names were Etruscanized, no Etruscan form of the word exists.

It indicates the name of the figlina (workshop) and/or the name of the owner of the workshop.

Painted stamps, tituli picti, recorded the weight of the container and the contents, and were applied after the amphora was filled.

Below: Panathenaic prize amphora in the black-figure style, showing the goddess Athena An amphora (Greek: Αμφορέας, English plural: amphorae or amphoras) is a type of container of a characteristic shape and size, descending from at least as early as the Neolithic Period.

Amphorae were used in vast numbers for the transport and storage of various products, both liquid and dry, but mostly for wine.

Ventris and Chadwick's translation is "carried on both sides." Amphorae varied greatly in height.