Dating outside jehovah witnesses

09-Sep-2019 14:05

These people brought their traditions and beliefs that later on were to be incorporated to the Brazilian culture and identity.In the 20th century the massive arrival of Japanese people along with other Asians (such as Koreans and Chinese) brought different religious practices into the country and the intensive process of globalization has provided the opportunity of getting in touch with several different religions and practices.In Brazil, there are 1.393.208 Jehovah’s Witnesses, according to the last census, dating from 2010.

According to IBGE, there are 3.848.786 spiritualists in Brazil.

The buildings of most traditional (and why not wealthier) Protestant churches obey a certain pattern, being easily identified as a church; but the ones that have not been in the market for too long are commonly placed in buildings that used to host stores and even bars.

According to IBGE, there are at least 20 types of Evangelical churches in Brazil, being divided into missionary and Pentecostal churches.

Below are the churches, organized by the number of followers (data obtained from the last census, from 2010).

Missionary churches Even though denominated as a Christian church, Jehovah’s Witnesses (or “Testemunhas de Jeová” in Portuguese) have no Trinitarian beliefs, differing from mainstream Christianity.

According to IBGE, there are 3.848.786 spiritualists in Brazil.

The buildings of most traditional (and why not wealthier) Protestant churches obey a certain pattern, being easily identified as a church; but the ones that have not been in the market for too long are commonly placed in buildings that used to host stores and even bars.

According to IBGE, there are at least 20 types of Evangelical churches in Brazil, being divided into missionary and Pentecostal churches.

Below are the churches, organized by the number of followers (data obtained from the last census, from 2010).

Missionary churches Even though denominated as a Christian church, Jehovah’s Witnesses (or “Testemunhas de Jeová” in Portuguese) have no Trinitarian beliefs, differing from mainstream Christianity.

The Northeast of Brazil is the region with the major number of Catholics, with Piauí state being the state with the major concentration of Catholics in Brazil (85% of the population).