Dating the writing of the gospels

01-Jan-2020 05:00

Logically (for a number of reasons), to me it only makes sense that the New Testament was written in Greek.

Think of who Paul was: the "Apostle to the Gentiles".

Obviously he was writing to Greek speaking people, so he would write to them in Greek. It was written regarding 'the names of God', but chapters 2 and 3 addressed the matter of the New Testament being written in Greek ('Did Jesus and the Apostles Speak Greek?

There are more reasons, but this is an obvious one. ' and ' Was the New Testament Originally Written in Hebrew?

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The Jewish people, because of their widespread dispersion in the Empire, for business and commercial purposes, mainly, spoke Greek rather fluently -- and this knowledge and usage of Greek was also common throughout Judea, as this new "funerary inscription" evidence attests! The Greek influence in Judea had grown very significantly since the days of Alexander the Great, circa 330 B. By the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, circa 168-165 B.In particular, Greek was well understood in "Galilee of the Gentiles," the region where Jesus Christ of Nazareth was raised, and grew up as a young lad.There is no doubt, therefore, that Jesus and the original apostles all spoke Greek -- commonly, as a "second language." First, let us explore the recent findings in Jerusalem of the actual tomb of Caiaphas, the high priest who condemned Christ.Writes Zvi Grenhut, archaeologist involved in the discovery and identification of the site, "Reburial in ossuaries appears mainly at the end of the first century B. Says Greenhut: "There is no doubt that this ossuary is special.Its elaborate decoration must have something to do with the name(s) inscribed on it.

The Jewish people, because of their widespread dispersion in the Empire, for business and commercial purposes, mainly, spoke Greek rather fluently -- and this knowledge and usage of Greek was also common throughout Judea, as this new "funerary inscription" evidence attests! The Greek influence in Judea had grown very significantly since the days of Alexander the Great, circa 330 B. By the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, circa 168-165 B.

In particular, Greek was well understood in "Galilee of the Gentiles," the region where Jesus Christ of Nazareth was raised, and grew up as a young lad.

There is no doubt, therefore, that Jesus and the original apostles all spoke Greek -- commonly, as a "second language." First, let us explore the recent findings in Jerusalem of the actual tomb of Caiaphas, the high priest who condemned Christ.

Writes Zvi Grenhut, archaeologist involved in the discovery and identification of the site, "Reburial in ossuaries appears mainly at the end of the first century B. Says Greenhut: "There is no doubt that this ossuary is special.

Its elaborate decoration must have something to do with the name(s) inscribed on it.

Could this be the ossuary of the high priest who presided at Jesus' trial?