Isotopic age dating patterson

29-Dec-2019 02:13

(I finally also ended up using the mass spectrometer with isotope dilution instead of alpha counting.) In part, our projects would attempt to verify several trace element abundances then prevalent in the meteorite literature which appeared (and turned out to be) erroneous, but Harrison also had the idea that lead isotope data from iron meteorites might reveal the isotopic composition of lead when the solar system first formed.He reasoned that the uranium concentrations in iron meteorites would probably be negligible compared to lead concentrations, so that the initial lead isotope ratios would be preserved.As it happened, the zircon yielded nearly concordant uranium-lead ages, although that did not turn out later to be true for all zircons.In any case, that promising start opened up a new field of dating for geologists, and has led to hundreds of age determinations on zircon.Harrison Brown had become interested in meteorites, and started a program to measure trace element abundances by the new analytical techniques that were developed during the war years.The meteorite data would serve to define elemental abundances in the solar system, which, among other applications, could be used to develop models for the formation of the elements.

He attended a small high school with fewer than 100 students, and later graduated from Grinnell College with an A. Laurie obtained a position as research infrared spectroscopist at the Illinois Institute of Technology to support him and their family while he pursued his Ph. In geochemistry those scientists included Harold Urey, Willard Libby, Harrison Brown, and Anthony Turkevich.That was the goal when Patterson began his dissertation project, however attaining it was to take considerably longer than we imagined at the time.Patterson started lead measurements in 1948 in a very dusty laboratory in Kent Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus.We finally obtained lead and uranium data on all of the major, and several of the accessory, minerals from the rock.Particularly important was the highly radiogenic lead found in zircon, which showed that a common accessory mineral in granites could be used for measuring accurate ages.

He attended a small high school with fewer than 100 students, and later graduated from Grinnell College with an A. Laurie obtained a position as research infrared spectroscopist at the Illinois Institute of Technology to support him and their family while he pursued his Ph. In geochemistry those scientists included Harold Urey, Willard Libby, Harrison Brown, and Anthony Turkevich.

That was the goal when Patterson began his dissertation project, however attaining it was to take considerably longer than we imagined at the time.

Patterson started lead measurements in 1948 in a very dusty laboratory in Kent Hall, one of the oldest buildings on campus.

We finally obtained lead and uranium data on all of the major, and several of the accessory, minerals from the rock.

Particularly important was the highly radiogenic lead found in zircon, which showed that a common accessory mineral in granites could be used for measuring accurate ages.

In spite of those handicaps, Patterson was able to attain processing blanks of circa 0.1 microgram, a very impressive achievement at the time, but now approximately equal to the total amount of sample lead commonly used for isotope analyses. Despite several obvious disadvantages, the method seemed to give reasonable dates on many rocks.