Mistakesindating com

21-Dec-2019 02:13

In more affluent homes that had rudimentary plumbing, the two p’s would make their way to either a private or communal cesspit, often buried underground to reduce the smell.These cesspits, or gongs as they were known (from the Old English “gang”, meaning “to go”), were designed such that the liquid waste would be absorbed into the surrounding soil (occasionally conveniently located near public wells…) while the solid waste would accumulate over a period of many months.

or they otherwise were simply overcome by the fumes before help could come.) Moving outside of Britain, famously Emperor Frederick I once was rescued from such a fate in 1184 by grabbing onto a window as the floor collapsed and hanging on for dear life until help came, though certain members of his court standing nearby were not so lucky.

It should also be noted that public latrine facilities did exist, often either emptying directly into a river, such as the ones on London Bridge, or otherwise collecting in a cesspit that would be routinely emptied as needed.

However, as the population swelled to massive numbers in certain cities, like London, the number of these facilities just couldn’t keep up with demand.

For example, in the early 14th century, tossing anything out your window into the streets of London, whether human waste or just any sort of garbage, could see you fined 40p, which is difficult to translate to modern values accurately, but is (very) roughly equivalent to £108 or 2.

And one couldn’t just hope that nobody would notice if you tried tossing your waste out the window.

or they otherwise were simply overcome by the fumes before help could come.) Moving outside of Britain, famously Emperor Frederick I once was rescued from such a fate in 1184 by grabbing onto a window as the floor collapsed and hanging on for dear life until help came, though certain members of his court standing nearby were not so lucky.It should also be noted that public latrine facilities did exist, often either emptying directly into a river, such as the ones on London Bridge, or otherwise collecting in a cesspit that would be routinely emptied as needed.However, as the population swelled to massive numbers in certain cities, like London, the number of these facilities just couldn’t keep up with demand.For example, in the early 14th century, tossing anything out your window into the streets of London, whether human waste or just any sort of garbage, could see you fined 40p, which is difficult to translate to modern values accurately, but is (very) roughly equivalent to £108 or 2.And one couldn’t just hope that nobody would notice if you tried tossing your waste out the window.We imagine having fire as the sole source of lighting doing such work probably also created a nice little bonus danger to the profession, though we couldn’t specifically find any documented record of a gong farmer dying as a result of gas pockets exploding (though, for what little it’s worth, there are some references who claim such did happen, but without citing a specific known instance).