Movie review blind dating

17-Oct-2019 07:56

She meets Bill at a bar where there's a memorial for her late boyfriend, who was hit by a bus while running after her.He was running because she had just dumped him, and Rose blames herself for the guy's untimely demise. He wants more, but she turns him down, saying that any relationship she might have now would be doomed.Bill won't call out his brother for his negative qualities because he doesn't want to be the guy who would shame his blind brother (There's also some guilt on Bill's part, hinted at early in the film and made explicit by the end).Bill's only recourse is to offer immature, sarcastic snipes when nobody is paying attention to him (which is often). Her entire sense of self-worth is based on what other people think of her.This music producer/former part-time reality star on that VH-1 show that seems to have a ton of incarnations is hiding out at the house of his sometime boss.Hiding out from women who want to sue him for child support and passing them STD’s.

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Writer/director Sophie Goodhart opens the film (her first feature, based on her short) on these specific notes of conflict.They are inclined to lie—to each other, in order to keep their relationships relatively nice and calm, and to themselves, in order to keep up the other lies. These are fairly decent people, and they lie because they want to stay decent—or at least to keep up the appearance of being good people.The plot involves a romantic triangle of sorts, although it's probable that there are no romantic feelings on the part of Rose (Jenny Slate), the woman who becomes involved with both brothers within a short span of time.Kroll and Slate, though, give performances that have the opposite effect.They aren't the best people, but the relative goodness of their intentions is never in doubt.

Writer/director Sophie Goodhart opens the film (her first feature, based on her short) on these specific notes of conflict.They are inclined to lie—to each other, in order to keep their relationships relatively nice and calm, and to themselves, in order to keep up the other lies. These are fairly decent people, and they lie because they want to stay decent—or at least to keep up the appearance of being good people.The plot involves a romantic triangle of sorts, although it's probable that there are no romantic feelings on the part of Rose (Jenny Slate), the woman who becomes involved with both brothers within a short span of time.Kroll and Slate, though, give performances that have the opposite effect.They aren't the best people, but the relative goodness of their intentions is never in doubt.When the parents of her dead boyfriend run into her and Robbie at a restaurant, she finds herself trying to apologize for how she has started dating again, and then she has to apologize to Robbie for the other apology.