Pontil scars on dating glass sex dating in stennett iowa

22-Dec-2019 18:40

See image #1 which is a mid-19th century sauce bottle.In addition, the rod would usually take with it some small glass fragments from the base of the bottle leaving a scar which is a round scattering of “bumps and gouges” without a distinctly unmarred scar center – like the blowpipe pontil scar described next. Blowpipe or “open” pontil scar (image #2) – This type of pontil mark – which was also called the “ring pontil” or “open pontil” – was formed when a hollow blowpipe was used as the pontil rod.It is at least as common on American made bottles as the glass tipped pontil mark (Boow 1991).Using a blowpipe for empontilling was likely done to both save on the number of tools used by the glass blower and to save time.It often must be confirmed by running ones finger over the base and feeling for the presence of a finger grabbing “sandpaper effect.” It feels and visually appears to be a generally round, sparse scattering of very fine sand, glass, or quartz grains imbedded onto and into the surface glass of the base.Some have described this as an “orange peel” effect (Mc Dougall 1990).Like the other pontil rod types, this one was probably removed by sharply tapping the rod near the attachment point.

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The base of a bottle which was held with a pontil rod will almost always retain some evidence of the pontil rod attachment.The sand pontil apparently conformed better than other pontil types to molded base shapes without distorting it (Jones 1971; Mc Dougall 1990).This type of pontil can be very subtle and hard to identify at times (it is also hard to photograph).A pontil rod held the bottle during the steps in the bottle blowing process where the blowpipe is removed (“cracked-off”) from the bottle and that break-off point is “finished”, i.e.the lip or “finish” is completed in some fashion, with or without additional glass.

The base of a bottle which was held with a pontil rod will almost always retain some evidence of the pontil rod attachment.The sand pontil apparently conformed better than other pontil types to molded base shapes without distorting it (Jones 1971; Mc Dougall 1990).This type of pontil can be very subtle and hard to identify at times (it is also hard to photograph).A pontil rod held the bottle during the steps in the bottle blowing process where the blowpipe is removed (“cracked-off”) from the bottle and that break-off point is “finished”, i.e.the lip or “finish” is completed in some fashion, with or without additional glass.When the rod was broken free of the bottle, a generally round but fragmented scar was left behind on the base.